Posts

Deadlift For Grip Strength : Which Grip Should You Use

I never trained to improve my overall grip strength through grip strength training exercises. I was lucky enough that the strength training I completed, indirectly and adequately strengthen my grip as well.

This is not true for all, some may need that supplemental grip strength training.

I’ve posted videos before about exercises I find beneficial to directly improve your grip strength. Most frequently when I’m approached about this topic, everyone refers to the deadlift to improve their grip strength.

You’re not wrong…

But how are you using the deadlift?

There is a vast difference between using the deadlift to improve overall strength gains, and using a deadlift to improve grip strength.

On top of that, what grip are you using?

If you’re using the deadlift to improve your overall strength gains, then by all means use any grip or straps you need to complete the lift safely.

After all we’re testing your deadlift in this scenario not your grip strength.

If you are using the deadlift to improve grip strength, I would highly suggest a double overhanded grip. And doing sets to failure or just a few rep shy of failure.

Getting that deep burn in the forearms, that you simply can not hold onto a bar any longer.

How I Almost Missed The Signs : My First Competition

I’ve always thought I was strong in a gym setting. Lifting with friends shooting for PRs.

I recently wanted to test myself, so I did my first weightlifting meet.

My goal was just to do well, considering I had no real expectations or understand how a meet was even ran.

I went 6/6

Snatching 122/268
Clean & Jerk 152/335.

I had the heaviest clean and jerk and heaviest snatch. Winning the overall as well.

My coach and I looked up the current national records for my division the snatch was 120.

It feels great to say I “unoffically” broke a national record by hitting that 122.

And a total that would place me 2nd in the nation!


 

Overhead Press : 1 Easy Tip To Push More Weight

I could not believe the difference in the videos!

This video just started out as a simple and effective drill I like to use, I wanted to share with my gym members to also improve their overhead position.

Then during the editing process I needed to go back and pull some of my old lifts to compare for contrast.

The differences was simply astonishing!

Now, there have been many hours of practice, drilling, and maybe a few kicks and screams going into the process.

As you can tell the end result is very visible.

It’s a simple drill, we’re just strict pressing (or military pressing) from the receiving position of our jerk.

I had a terrible problem of not maintaining midline stabilization during my earlier lifts in which allowed my chest to travel forward, pushing the barbell out in front of me and having to finish the lift pulling the barbell back overhead.

It happen in almost every lift I did.

Once I started implementing this drill, it drasticly improved and fixed my overhead position. Since the drill is not happening at lightning speed, it allows you to visibly see any imbalances occurring in the lift.

I do this drill every day before moving weight overhead!


 

Strength Training For BJJ : How to Find Balance

“Train Smarter Not Harder”

I’m sure at some point you’ve heard any variation of that quote. Buy why wouldn’t we work on training harder AND smarter.

I’m frequently ask in one way or another from athletes in our gym, how they should split up their strength training with their Jiu Jitsu.

First, don’t over do it! Don’t think you HAVE to do BJJ and strength training in the same day.

Like most cases limiting factors outside of time is sleep, nutrition, and age. All playing a major role in your capacity to train and recover.

Those being our limiting factors, I NEVER recommend doing BJJ and Strength training back to back.

There is some gray area here in which you use one for technique one for a hard session. But in general when this question is ask,

I’m assuming you’re looking at putting eighty to ninety percent effort into both your Jiu Jitsu and strength training.

In which case one will suffer. Split it up based on your priorities. Not everything has to be done EVERY DAY!

Be mindful of your training, your body, listen to it! You have to find what works for you, don’t force it!


 

Power Jerk: Perfecting The Dip & Drive

It wouldn’t be over indulging to say I enjoy lifting.

In fact, outside of spending time with my wife and beautiful daughter, I cant think of a simpler activity that brings me more joy.

A few months back I attended a weightlifting seminar in Columbus, OH.

When it was over, the instructor approached m giving me merit on my mechanics and movements. After a brief conversational bout lifting he ask me who coaches me.

It was an eye opening moment in my career.

I’ve always just lifted with friends, attended seminars, but never had someone work on individual development for my Olympic lifting.

Now this instructor was 6ft 6inch easy, and I’m 5ft 7inch on a good day.

Making it easy to remember him towering over me, head tilted to the side and a blank stare saying “But why? Everyone who wants to get better at any sport needs a coach.”

I knew I wanted to start competing, but knew I’d need to reach out to those with vastly more experience than I have.

After asking around to other coaches in the area, I kept hearing the same recommendations Joe Hamblen.

We’ve been working now for around 6-7 weeks, and while the weight we’re using is light.

My lifts have improved more in that time than when I started!