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Deadlift For Grip Strength : Which Grip Should You Use

I never trained to improve my overall grip strength through grip strength training exercises. I was lucky enough that the strength training I completed, indirectly and adequately strengthen my grip as well.

This is not true for all, some may need that supplemental grip strength training.

I’ve posted videos before about exercises I find beneficial to directly improve your grip strength. Most frequently when I’m approached about this topic, everyone refers to the deadlift to improve their grip strength.

You’re not wrong…

But how are you using the deadlift?

There is a vast difference between using the deadlift to improve overall strength gains, and using a deadlift to improve grip strength.

On top of that, what grip are you using?

If you’re using the deadlift to improve your overall strength gains, then by all means use any grip or straps you need to complete the lift safely.

After all we’re testing your deadlift in this scenario not your grip strength.

If you are using the deadlift to improve grip strength, I would highly suggest a double overhanded grip. And doing sets to failure or just a few rep shy of failure.

Getting that deep burn in the forearms, that you simply can not hold onto a bar any longer.

BJJ : How to Build Your Conditioning For Jiu Jitsu

“I need to start training with you to get my cardio up.”
Regardless if said with the intentions of following through, or passively mention iust acknowledge lack of cardio.
If you’re an athlete at our gym, at some point you’ve told Chewy or myself “I need to start training with you to get my cardio up.”
The disconnect there is our Instagram and YouTube is filled with the highlights.
The heavy lifting, the one rep max, the fun stuff everyone wants to see.
The real truth behind building up your cardio, it’s not sexy.  It’s not fun, you will not enjoy it.
When it comes to building your conditioning for Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, athletes tend to misconnect “workout” as building conditioning.
Building workout conditioning such as you’ll see in crossfit style workouts, while has some benefits, does not relate well to your mat wind.
These are two different types of cardio, and can easily be exposed.
I like to recommend athletes who want to work on their pure cardio, interval training, in the same fashion they roll.  
Five to six minute rounds of intervals.  Going one to two minutes over their match times.  Here’s an example of our workout.
6 Minutes of:
:20 sprint – :10 rest
**Rest 3 Minutes**
6 Minutes of:
:10 sprint – :20 rest
**Rest 3 Minutes**
6 Minutes of:
:20 sprint – :10 rest
**Rest 3 Minutes**


Overhead Press : 1 Easy Tip To Push More Weight

I could not believe the difference in the videos!

This video just started out as a simple and effective drill I like to use, I wanted to share with my gym members to also improve their overhead position.

Then during the editing process I needed to go back and pull some of my old lifts to compare for contrast.

The differences was simply astonishing!

Now, there have been many hours of practice, drilling, and maybe a few kicks and screams going into the process.

As you can tell the end result is very visible.

It’s a simple drill, we’re just strict pressing (or military pressing) from the receiving position of our jerk.

I had a terrible problem of not maintaining midline stabilization during my earlier lifts in which allowed my chest to travel forward, pushing the barbell out in front of me and having to finish the lift pulling the barbell back overhead.

It happen in almost every lift I did.

Once I started implementing this drill, it drasticly improved and fixed my overhead position. Since the drill is not happening at lightning speed, it allows you to visibly see any imbalances occurring in the lift.

I do this drill every day before moving weight overhead!


 

The Whiteboard Culture: Why Your Score Doesn’t Always Matter

We all exercise and workout to try and improve ourselves.

Whether we are trying to lose weight, lift heavier, or gain endurance we are all trying to improve in some way.

While keeping track of our score in a workout in a great way to track progress over time and measure improvements, it does not always lead to improvements in our health and fitness.

It can be easy to use those scores to determine performance. Our entire perception of our fitness level is now determined by our score.

In most cases this comes at a cost, we no longer pay attention to our technique and mechanics. The soul focus becomes the score board.

The reason technique and mechanics matter is to get the best benefit possible from the movement.

But without a workout score, how do we determine the quality of our training. Ask yourself these questions

  • Did I move the entire workout and give my best effort for the duration of the workout?
  • Did I focus on keeping my movement correct for the entire workout?
  • Did I improve myself in some way during this workout?

If you can answer Yes to all of these questions then you had a quality workout, regardless of what your final score may be. So for your next workout, pay less attention to putting up the highest score and pay more attention to how you are preforming your movements and the effort you are putting forth.

– Hussey

How to Make the Deadball & Sandbag Cleans So Much Easier!

It’s hard to do any type of weightlifting, powerlifting, or any version of strength and conditioning in general that we don’t naturally migrate toward the use barbell.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m very partial to a barbell myself.   But at times its nice to have a change of pace with some odd object training.

If you think about it, nothing is more traditional than Sandbags, Wreck Bags, Dead Balls, and Atlas Stones.

The barbell wasn’t even invented until 1910.  While dumbbells can date back to Greco Roman days, moving stones as a measurement of strength can be traced back even further.

Traditional lifting, Olympic Weightlifting, Powerlifting, whatever your choice of poison can at times make you complacent.

To spice things up, during my de-load and reload weeks is add in a little odd object training.  Just for a change of pace.

I gravitate toward the use of sandbag and dead ball movements during this part of my programing.

Nothing to crazy just enough to change up some movement pattern and mechanics.

My two preferred methods I like to use depending on the weight and volume are the Lap Method and the Scoop Method.

Each having their own special benefit, with limiting factors of each.